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News Eagle - Hawley, PA
  • Pond Eddy Bridge limited to 4 tons

  • Following a program of regular bridge inspection, PennDOT District 4 has determined that it will downpost the Route 1011, the Pond Eddy Bridge spanning the Delaware between Pike County, PA. and New York State, to four tons from seven tons due to deterioration. 


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  • Following a program of regular bridge inspection, PennDOT District 4 has determined that it will downpost the Route 1011, the Pond Eddy Bridge spanning the Delaware between Pike County, PA. and New York State, to four tons from seven tons due to deterioration.  
    Signs were being posted on the PA side by the end of Friday, Dec. 17; NY State has posted signs on its side of the bridge.
    PennDOT will follow emergency procedures in selecting a contractor to conduct repairs as soon as possible. PennDOT bridge engineers report that 70 stringers which support the bridge deck, will need to be replaced at an estimated cost of $350,000 to $500,000. The repairs will be made to reestablish the 7-ton posting.
    PennDOT made repairs to the bridge piers last summer.
    The bridge links the hamlet of Pond Eddy, PA in Shohola Township- the only vehicular road to the community- and Pond Eddy, NY, Town of Lumberland, along New York Route 97. There are 26 properties on the Pennsylvania side.
    In the Fall of 2006, deterioration resulted in the bridge being downposted to three tons. It was restored to seven tons following repairs made by PennDOT.
    The downposting created challenges to homeowners and service providers whose vehicle weights surpassed the restriction. Included are snow plowing, emergency vehicles, heating fuels and trash removal services to home owners. PennDOT Pike County maintenance forces will continue to maintain the existing bridge beams to provide residents with safe access prior to construction of the new bridge.
    Analysis shows that improvements could be made to the existing structure to increase capacity to about 16 to 18 tons, but that this solution would likely be more costly than replacement and would not provide full functionality.
    Over several years of debate, PennDOT is still planning to replace the bridge, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Built in 1904, the steel petit truss bridge has a wooden deck.
    Options have been to maintain the existing bridge, rehabilitate it,  putting in a new bridge, or eliminating the span after buying out the Pennsylvania properties. PennDOT listed the bridge for sale, with help in relocating the bridge,  not to exceed the estimated $500,000 to demolish it.
    The new span would be placed 66 feet upstream.
    PennDOT spokesperson Karen Dussinger stated that the new bridge  is still delayed in the environmental process. Because it's a NY/PA shared bridge, the project must go through both agencies’ procedures. The project is targeted to go to bid in late 2012, with construction beginning in the spring of 2013, but the dates could change.
    The estimated project cost ranged from $8.5 million to $11 million.
    On-line:
    www.dot.state.pa.us

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