The Pike County Historical Society has a brand new exhibit entitled “Every Picture Tells a Story” which is a room filled with unique and valuable photographs, prints and paintings that are associated with well known artists who lived in the area.


The Pike County Historical Society has a brand new exhibit entitled “Every Picture Tells a Story” which is a room filled with unique and valuable photographs, prints and paintings that are associated with well known artists who lived in the area.
Rachel Demalderis, a graduate of Delaware Valley High School and of Boston College in the field of Art History helped research the artifacts on display.  One particular fascinating subject is a glass case full of artfully displayed birds which were preserved by a local taxidermist and used in several well known paintings by John James Audubon.
John G. Bell, the taxidermist lived in Matamoras in the 1850s and 1860s and traveled with Audubon on his treks on the Missouri River.
Some of the birds in this case were originally on display at the Peale Museum in Philadelphia which was one of the first museums in our country. There is an actual Passenger Pigeon which is now extinct as well as many birds displayed on branches. It is an original piece that is extremely rare as well as valuable.
Other pieces on display are Remington prints and a photograph of Chief Thundercloud who lived in Dingman’s Ferry and modeled for several paintings by Frederick Remington, the well known artist of the American West.
A stand out painting is a vase of pink roses which is now called the “Milford Rose.” However, the rose, itself is from France. Currently the Milford Garden Club is looking into growing this unique flower once again.
The Pike County Historical Society is located in the impressive “Columns Building” originally a private home owned by Dennis McLaughlin of New Jersey and purchased by the historical society in the late 1980s.
All of the rooms hold history that has a connection to this area, the most well known being the Lincoln room purported to have a United States flag of the Civil War era which may have wrapped the president as he lay dying in Ford Theatre after having been fatally shot. The actress in the play he was attending moved to Milford and took with her some of her costumes which have also been on display as well as the flag. DNA has proved the flag is smeared with blood.
The Columns is open Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The website is www.Pikecountyhistoricalsociety.org. Phone: (570)296-8126.