Several local conservation and environmental groups were present at the regular meeting of the Pike County Commissioners on Wednesday to call attention to Earth Day, April 22. The day was first recognized in 1970 in a national move to organize to preserve and protect our national resources and especially to learn to recycle, rather than dispose.


Several local conservation and environmental groups were present at the regular meeting of the Pike County Commissioners on Wednesday to call attention to Earth Day, April 22. The day was first recognized in 1970 in a national move to organize to preserve and protect our national resources and especially to learn to recycle, rather than dispose.
Commissioners marked the day by calling attention to the county’s single stream recycling program which allows participants to recycle a wide array of paper, plastics, metal and glass without sorting. The Beach Lake Transfer Station began providing single stream recycling in early 2010. Residents had previously been required to separate products before putting them curb side.
Board members of the Scenic Rural Character Preservation Program were present to recognize the five year anniversary in Pike County. Five years ago, with the population growth and the pressures of land development in the county, there was a need to protect, preserve and enhance our scenic rural character and to keep our drinking water pure as well as to preserve wildlife habitats. A bond referendum was placed on the ballot with the backing of the Pike County Commissioners and received 68 per cent of a “yes” vote and therefore, was established in April, 2006. Since then, there have been 16 planning projects in nine municipalities and funding has increased to nearly $5 million from various sources to protect 2700 acres.
Pike County Commissioner Karl Wagner (D) commented “This has helped our economy through tourism and development.” Chairman Richard Caridi added, “You have done your job in an exemplary fashion” to the board members present.
Also present was John Humbrose, Community Relations Coordinator of Waste Management in Taylor, PA. Humbrose presented a show depicting workers in the process of recycling waste and depicting the processing of plastics, newspapers and other items which can be turned back into useable products. “Glass comes from sand and aluminum comes from mining, by the recycling of cans we lower having to mine for more aluminum,” he said. “In 2009 we have conserved 9 million tons of plastics, gas and metals.” He added, “It is possible for recycled products to be back on the shelf within 60 days.”
In the same vein, Christine Obser was present to advertise a program entitled “National Take Back Initiative for the community to surrender expired, unwanted, unused pharmaceuticals and other medications.” On Saturday, April 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Shohola Township Municipal Building, the community is asked to bring in drugs that are no longer being used and are stashed somewhere in a medicine cabinet where they may fall into children’s hands. For more information on this program, call (570)559-7394.
Susan Beecher of the Pike County Conservation District was also present and brought along the 2010 Annual Report for the public. She especially pinpointed the Common Waters, a regional partnership of public and non-profit organizations and agencies which will focus on supporting sustainable communities and working landscapes in the Upper Delaware River Watershed areas. In literature that she presented, Common Waters Partnership with support from the Pinchot Institute for Conservation, worked in 2010 to establish the Common Waters Fund to protect forested headwaters for the protection of local water quality. It is a tri-state endeavor which includes Pike and Wayne Counties in Pennsylvania, Sullivan and Delaware Counties in New York and Sussex County in New Jersey.