Managing EditorHAWLEY- This story picks up following the devastating fire of October 18, 1952 when Hawley Borough Hall, along with Hawley Fire Company No. 1 were lost, as well as two neighboring homes on Spring Street.?The great fire in 1952 showed the importance of local fire companies as neighbors, working together. It is a lesson in cooperation so vital today, when volunteers have become much more difficult to locate.?Hawley had two stations at the time of the borough hall fire. The one from Boogy Wegge’s garage on Paupack Street was up at the Fire Prevention Week parade in Honesdale. The one left behind “in case it was needed” was destroyed in its bay, on Spring Street.?Patrick Monaghan was chief at the time.?When a replacement fire truck was acquired, it was kept at various locations, including a Church Street garage next to the Baptist Church.?Hawley Borough Council moved to the American Legion Post on Church Street. After some controversy about possibly putting a new borough hall and fire station right in Bingham Park, in 1964, the Borough purchased the former Monaghan Garage across the street.?This became the Borough offices, where it is to this day; the fire company was housed on the right side. Co. 2’s fire apparatus also moved there, as well as an ambulance service, which was formed in 1957 by the fire company.?The two fire companies officially merged in 1977. Hawley Ambulance & Rescue Company was set up as a separate organization in 1972.?Andres Hotel burns?A few blazes have rocked Hawley in the last 40 years. On November 9, 1979, the former Andres Hotel, then known as “The Pub,” burned to the ground. The old brick hotel stood at the corner of Penn Avenue and Keystone Street, opposite from the Ritz Theater. The lack of 911 dispatching led to several minutes delay between the discovery of the fire and notification of the fire Department.?The owner was unable to reach the fire house by phone, but was able to call the assistant fire chief, Philip Hunt, who was at his print shop.?At that time the fire company maintained five “fire phones” in various residences and businesses in town but no one was near enough to hear the call that morning.?Harry McDonnell was chief at the time.?Eugene E. Krause, who is today deputy chief, had been a fireman about three years. He recalled that it was the hottest fire they had experienced in all his time in the Department. The heat was melting parking meters and damaged metal fixtures on buildings across the street. The hotel was consumed in 90 minutes, but the work of over 100 firefighters saved nearby buildings. A parking lot replaced the hotel site.?This hotel was built in the mid-1890’s. An 1897 map shows it as the Farmer’s Exchange Hotel. By 1903, it was known as the Kohlmann House. In 1928 it was sold to Louis W. and Catherine Andres, who renamed it the “Hotel Andres.” Their son Louis and his wife Lucy bought it in 1941. In 1969, Harold Shook and his wife bought it, and renamed it “The Pub.” Later owners were Daniel Corcoran and Gordan Potartz and his wife.?John “Woody” Kistler” bought it in 1975 and had it at the time of the fire.?There would be more bad fires to come, and further progress for Hawley Fire Department.?To be continued...