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News Eagle - Hawley, PA
  • Historic preservation awards given

  • The Wayne County Historical Society presented their 20th annual awards for historic preservation at a ceremony October 26th at their main museum.
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  • The Wayne County Historical Society presented their 20th annual awards for historic preservation at a ceremony October 26th at their main museum.
    Trustee Juan Espino first called for a "moment of silence" for Gloria McCullough, who for 20 years served as their Research Librarian before her death in August.
    Elaine Herzog, Society President, presented the first award to James and Bette Asselstine for preserving the Dorflinger cut glass factory and office building in White Mills, a project with showcases how the fine glassware was produced.
    James Asselstine noted that this project augments the Dorflinger story told through the long established glass museum at the Dorflinger-Suydam Sanctuary. Coupled with the recently opened D&H Canal Park and the other projects of the Wayne County Historical Society, they all serve to help make this area a destination for heritage tourism, he added.
    Equinunk Historical Society received the next award, for enhancing the Calder Museum with an addition that complements the historic building while giving the organization meeting and added exhibit space. Robert Wood, past president of the Equinunk Historical Society, accepted the award on behalf of their group. The Calder House, along with their busy schedule of programs through the year, the Joel Hill Sawmill and the annual car show they sponsor, highlight their activities. Wood said that they had 172 entries this year at the popular car show.
    The Inn at Starlight Lake received an award for preserving the historic, 1907 structure in Starlight, Buckingham Township. Robert Franciose accepted the award on behalf of the family-owned business, owned by his mother-in-law Sari Schwartz.
    Franciose said that their inn is the oldest surviving railroad inn continually operated in America. The inn was built alongside the Ontario & Western Railroad which cut through northern Wayne County. Along with coal and other cargo finding a new way to market, local farmers utilized the O&W to ship milk, and city-weary tourists came to northern Wayne on the train for refreshment, staying at the inn and other places.
    He added that their family is only the third to operate the Inn at Starlight, serving as "guardians" of the historic landmark. The restaurant started in the 1980's and is open year-round. He said that their are applying for National Historic Register status.
    For more information on the Wayne County Historical Society, call 570-253-3240 or visit online at www.waynehistorypa.org.
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