Courtney Bailey expected to get a ticket or two when she was pulled over recently on Roxboro Street in Durham, North Carolina. She was speeding and not wearing a seatbelt, and her car registration had expired. When Durham police officer Dan Strandh asked why, she told him she had a young son and "money goes toward him, and not the car." (She had six cents in her bank account and $1 in her glove compartment.) Officer Strandh told her to follow him to an automative repair shop, where her car failed inspection because one tire was almost bald.


At the repair shop, officer Strandh paid $200 out of his own pocket to have a new tire put on Bailey's car so it would pass inspection. "This cop, who I had never met, was really going out of the goodness of his heart," Bailey said. "Not only did he pay all that money for my car, but he didn't give me the three tickets that he owed me. I boohooed my face off." Then she added, "All black people ain't criminals. All police ain't looking to kill us. Something has to give, and especially after today, I'm willing to give it a chance."