LAKE REGION - Autumn's glory is in evidence in the Lake Region and Pike County, where the peak of the fall colors seems to have arrived. A ride down through Pike's woodland over the weekend overwhelmed the eyes with trees that burst forth in crimson red, lemon yellow and fiery orange.
Also fascinating is the current draw down at Lake Wallenpaupack. Every five years the power utility is required to lower the lake level in autumn for regular dam maintenance. This had always been done by PPL, or P.P. & L. as it was formerly known. Since changing hands, this is the first time the lake' new owner, Brookfield Renewable Energy Partners has performed the work.

LAKE REGION -   Autumn’s glory is in evidence in the Lake Region and Pike County, where the peak of the fall colors seems to have arrived. A ride down through Pike’s woodland over the weekend overwhelmed the eyes with trees that burst forth in crimson red, lemon yellow and fiery orange.
  Also fascinating is the current draw down at Lake Wallenpaupack. Every five years the power utility is required to lower the lake level in autumn for regular dam maintenance. This had always been done by PPL, or P.P. & L. as it was formerly known. Since changing hands, this is the first time the lake’ new owner, Brookfield Renewable Energy Partners has performed the work.
   The 2016 season has one again seen the lake drop by around five feet more than normal. As of Sunday, October 16th the lake was at 1,174.53 feet, and was 29.55% full. Its normal high water mark is on June 1st, when their federal license requires the lake be at 1,187 feet.
   The drawdown is especially noticeable at shallow areas such as off the Palmyra Township beach where now there is a wide expanse to walk till you reach the water’s edge. Hard to believe in June, the beach was only a narrow strip of sand.
   Numerous people, often couples or families, were seen this weekend exploring the rarely seen portion of lake bed.
   Just imagine that before the lake was finished in 1926, this was a broad and fertile valley of farms and forests, with a river running down the middle of it. At the northeast end, between Mangan’s Cove and the beach area was the settlement of Wilsonville, which had to be displaced when P.P.& L. built the dam.
   Of much interest while out on the lake bed was a long row of stones, which appeared to be a wall flattened out- likely a farmer’s boundary fence. At one end it made a “T” with another long, flattened row. The other end disappeared where the lake had receded.
   Some people go out with metal detectors. Amateur archaeologists hope to find arrow heads. A casual glance did not see much other than rocks and a few mussel shells; there was an occasional beer can and one rusted boat engine.
   On top of enjoying the colors and the spectacle of the lake drawdown is the current “Indian Summer” we are experiencing. What a joy to step outside. Enjoy this special time of year.